Saturday, November 26, 2016

Devlog: Fates and Constellations #02

Here's a quick look into the level creation process:


We procedurally generate the splitting lines, choose the pattern that we like, then build the level based off the lines in our crude but functional editor.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Devlog: Fates and Constellations #01

Welp, I figure it's time I start treating this blog a tad more seriously. So, starting from today, I'll be updating this blog while simultaneously keeping this devlog up to date.

Now that tech powerhouse jon is absolutely tied up with porting Spacejacked to PS4 and PSVita by himself, it makes perfect sense for our company to embark on smaller title(s) that I can work for the time being while jon works his magic for the consoles. 

Along comes...

Fates and Constellations




That's the title we're going with for now. Said game is a puzzle game where you cut "rogue" constellations out of the night skies by splitting lines. Jon and I have actually talked about wanting to make this game way before we were done with Spacejacked, but never got to it. That said, the game as it is now is pretty darn different from how we first envisioned it (ain't that always the case).


How does it work?


For every puzzle presented in the form of a constellation, the player is given a limited number of splits. The idea is to split the line and cut the connections between the stars without actually touching the stars themselves. Bonus points if you touch the golden star though ;)

A major part of the game is how exponentially complex it gets each time the player splits the lines. We intend to fully explore this by introducing some asymmetrical splitting patterns some time down the line.

There are still a lot to be done, feature-wise. The following are just some of the stuff we need to do:
  • Different splitting patterns
  • More themes (visuals)
  • Design Levels
  • Title and menus
  • Polish

Random Thoughts


Now, what started as yet another prototype is beginning to show promise. Obviously I couldn't be happier. That said, it's starting to feel a little weird that each of us are essentially working on completely different things in the company at the moment. I do enjoy having the autonomy and the ability to build the game with no roadblocks whatsoever - but I already have that with my side projects. That's what Death Cabin's for. That's what JOTR is. A part of me crave the time where we were all trying to unscramble the mess in Spacejacked during the early stage of production, each of us tackling a core part of the same game. With that in mind, I can't wait for us to launch Spacejacked on the consoles next year so jon and I can get to develop our next big project - one that is big enough for at least the 2 of us to work on simultaneously.